Do you ever wonder what goes on at the expensive college you sent your kids to? Maybe they go to lectures and listen to this, Professor: Exterminate white people:

“Now how do I know that the white people know that we are going to come up with a solution to the problem? I know it because they have retina scans, they have what they call racial profiling, DNA banks, and they’re monitoring our people to try to prevent the one person from coming up with the one idea. And the one idea is, how we are going to exterminate white people because that in my estimation is the only conclusion I have come to. We have to exterminate white people off the face of the planet to solve this problem.”

I seriously doubt that on their insulated college campus they will come across someone as thoughtful as this, Witness, by Shelby Steele:

Probably the single greatest problem between blacks and whites in America is that we are forever witness to each other’s great shames. This occurred to me in the immediate aftermath of Katrina, when so many black people were plunged into misery that it seemed the hurricane itself had held a racial animus. I felt a consuming empathy but also another, more atavistic impulse. I did not like my people being seen this way. Beyond the human mess one expects to see after a storm like this, another kind of human wretchedness was on display. In the people traversing waist-deep water and languishing on rooftops were the markers of a deep and static poverty. The despair over the storm that was so evident in people’s faces seemed to come out of an older despair, one that had always been there. Here–40 years after the great civil rights victories and 50 years after Rosa Parks’s great refusal–was a poverty that oppression could no longer entirely explain. Here was poverty with an element of surrender in it that seemed to confirm the worst charges against blacks: that we are inferior, that nothing really helps us, that the modern world is beyond our reach.

Read the whole piece.

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